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Vocational Schools, Online Degrees and Programs

Vocations cover broad categories--with roles spanning from that of automotive technician to electrician to locksmithing and beyond. From the traditional side, careers like carpentry and plumbing today still involve most of the same skills passed down from master to novice. Vocational programs and classes cover the basics, with much of the job skills necessary developed in field work as a journeyman. With recent catastrophic oil spills, prospective students might want to consider environmental science and protection technicians positions. These jobs are charged with conducting tests in the field to monitor and resolve pollution problems.

How to Prepare for a Vocational Career

When considering a vocational program, candidates are advised to carefully evaluate the course requirements. Pharmacists’ assistants require formal training ranging from six months to two years, with on-the-job training of three to twelve months. Courses include medical terminology and record-keeping. Carpentry and allied fields, by contrast, tend to place greater emphasis on actual hands-on experience in the field as part of their training. A good place to begin assessing the expected future prospects of various trades is the Occupational Handbook published by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Pharmacy technicians can expect to enjoy ""much faster than average career advancement,"" according to BLS. On the other hand, carpentry is expected to grow at simply an ""average"" rate. Most vocations require a high school diploma or GED. While the carpenter can be expected to earn some $35,100 over all, his counterpart in high-rise construction can earn considerably more. This is particularly true of high-rise crane operators, who can earn up to some $69,600 on average or even more; the San Francisco Bay Area is a region where this can be expected.

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