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Physical Therapy Degree - Online and Campus Programs

Physical therapists help people regain mobility due to injury or illness and prevent loss of mobility despite disease and aging. Excellent job prospects await those with a physical therapy degree or physical therapy certification.

Physical Therapy Programs: How to Decide Which One Is Right for You

Physical therapists entering the field need either a master's degree or a doctorate degree. Some registered nurses or nurse health practitioners also go on to specialize as physical therapist nurses. Regardless of the specialty, graduate physical therapy degrees require coursework in: biology, anatomy and physiology, cellular histology, exercise physiology, neuroscience, biomechanics, behavioral science, radiology and imaging, pharmacology, and pathology. To become a physical therapy assistant, you need an associate's degree from a physical therapy program. Physical therapy aides generally receive on-the-job training and are not required to have a degree. Physical therapy certification or licensure is required in every state for physical therapists and some physical therapy assistants. While requirements for physical therapy certification vary state-to-state, you must graduate from an accredited physical therapy program to be eligible for licensure. Physical therapist nurses must also be licensed RNs.

Earnings Outlook: Physical Therapists, Physical Therapy Assistants, Physical Therapy Aides

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, average 2008 salaries for physical therapy professionals were as follows:
  • Physical Therapist: $72,790
  • Physical Therapist Assistant:$46,140
  • Physical Therapy Aide: $23,760
  • Registered Nurse: $62,450
If you like helping others get a move on and have the dedication it takes to earn your degree, consider becoming a physical therapist.